The power plant of Kardia, Greece, viewed through a  destroyed house in the village of Charavgi, some 500 km north of  Athens, on September 29, 2011. According to a May 2007 WWF survey called  “Dirty Thirty”, the Greek Public Power Corporation’s (PPC) power plants  of Kardia and Agios Dimitrios are the EU’s top two polluting stations.  The once flourishing nearby villages of Charavgi and Kleitos have been  gradually abandoned since PPC opened the two mines. The company “bought”  the villages and relocated residents elsewhere. The only person who now  lives in Kleitos is an Indian immigrant, Jangdip Pal, 45, who works as a  nightguard at the mine. And only one shepherd and his family live in  Charavgi. The power plants produce 70 percent of Greece’s electricity. (Reuters/Yannis Behrakis)

Oct 28 -

The power plant of Kardia, Greece, viewed through a destroyed house in the village of Charavgi, some 500 km north of Athens, on September 29, 2011. According to a May 2007 WWF survey called “Dirty Thirty”, the Greek Public Power Corporation’s (PPC) power plants of Kardia and Agios Dimitrios are the EU’s top two polluting stations. The once flourishing nearby villages of Charavgi and Kleitos have been gradually abandoned since PPC opened the two mines. The company “bought” the villages and relocated residents elsewhere. The only person who now lives in Kleitos is an Indian immigrant, Jangdip Pal, 45, who works as a nightguard at the mine. And only one shepherd and his family live in Charavgi. The power plants produce 70 percent of Greece’s electricity. (Reuters/Yannis Behrakis)